Occupational Skin Disease

Health care services use by workers with work-related contact dermatitis.

Holness DL. Dermatitis. 2004 Mar;15(1):18-24. BACKGROUND: There is little information in the literature regarding the use of health care services by workers with occupational contact dermatitis. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to describe the use of health care services by workers with...

Return-to-work barriers for workers with contact dermatitis.

Holness DL. Contact Dermatitis. 2003 Dec;49(6):273-5. There is little information available regarding barriers to return-to-work (RTW) in workers with contact dermatitis. The purpose of this study was to survey occupational health and safety personnel to determine their perceptions regarding RTW...

Systematic review of treatment and prevention of contact dermatitis

As background for the Dermatitis Program of Care, we conducted a systematic review of the literature on contact dermatitis to aid in the provision of evidence-based recommendations. Forty nine studies met inclusion criteria.

Physician occupational disease practice survey

Our objective was to understand practice patterns, barriers to early recognition, and educational needs for family practitioners and dermatologists in Ontario. We developed a survey (based on the literature and interviews with dermatologists and family practitioners), and then used it to survey all dermatologists (57% response rate) and a random sample of 600 family practitioners (26% response rate) in Ontario.

Stakeholder survey of return-to-work barriers for workers with hand dermatitis

Our goal was to identify and learn more about RTW barriers for workers with CD. For this study, we surveyed 21 occupational health and safety personnel during an occupational health and safety research conference. The participants were presented with 3 pictures of varying degrees of work-related hand CD, and asked to list the 3 key barriers or challenges in RTW for individuals with CD.

Patient perception of the value of the clinical encounter

The objectives of the study were to explore health service utilization and perceived helpfulness of care for patients with possible work-related contact dermatitis. Patients attending the OHC at SMH over a two month period were surveyed to collect information related to health service utilization and the perceived helpfulness of care in 2002.

Workplace screening for hand dermatitis in the health care setting

Our goal was to determine the feasibility of screening in the health care sector to identify workers with hand dermatitis. 139 hospital personnel visiting an Employee Health Unit over a six week period in February and March 2002 were surveyed using a self-administered questionnaire. Hand examination was also conducted.

Outcomes in contact dermatitis

We were interested in learning more about outcomes (disease-related, functional, and quality of life) for workers following a diagnosis of WRCD; the return to work process (including the roles of the injured worker, employer, health care providers, and others), and any workplace modifications made to accommodate the worker with WRCD; and workers’ compensation for WRCD. One hundred workers with hand dermatitis were enrolled at the St. Michael’s Hospital Occupational Health Clinic (Toronto), and were followed for 6 months post-assessment. We collected information through questionnaires at the time of diagnosis, and at 3 and 6 months.

Cutaneous problems related to glove use in health care workers

The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of irritant and allergic contact dermatitis and contact urticaria in health care workers presenting with hand dermatitis thought to be related to glove use. Retrospective chart review of 55 workers with abstraction of clinical information and prick and patch test results.

WSIB dermatitis claims file review

The objective of the study was to review the medical information in a compensation claim file and determine the associations between available information and decisions. Fifty WSIB dermatitis claim files were abstracted in 1998.